Linux basic configurations - linux basics http://www.basicconfig.com/taxonomy/term/1 en Linux basics tutorial http://www.basicconfig.com/linux/linux-basics-tutorial <!-- google_ad_section_start --><div class="field field-name-body field-type-text-with-summary field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even" property="content:encoded"><h2>Overview</h2> <p>Every Linux user should learn Linux basics and how Linux works before they can use Linux, as a desktop operating system or as a server. Linux is not very hard too learn. If you have experience using other operating system before, you probably have to spend some times to get used with Linux environment, depends on what operating system you have used. It is very important to learn the basics of Linux operating system. Although you can find a step by step tutorial on how to setup Linux server, for example, but without basic Linux knowledge, you won't be able to understand what you are doing. Spend some times to learn basics of Linux would save your times in the future.</p> <div class="services"> <div class="service-left grid_6 alpha"> <h2>First boot into Linux terminal</h2> <img src="/sites/all/themes/corporateclean/mockup/web-design.png" style="float:left; padding:0 10px 0 0;"/>After finished the Linux installation process, Linux is going to reboot to complete the installation. Slackware Linux or Ubuntu server first boot will land you in a command line terminal. <div style="clear:both; padding:10px 0 0 0; text-align:right;"><a class="more" href="/linux_first_boot">View page</a></div> </div> <div class="service-right grid_6 omega"> <h2>Change Linux command line terminal</h2> <img src="/sites/all/themes/corporateclean/mockup/graphic-design.png" style="float:left; padding:0 10px 0 0;"/>In Linux, there are six command line terminals by default. What is that means? Linux command line terminal also called virtual console. In windows, it's called command prompt. <div style="clear:both; padding:10px 0 0 0; text-align:right;"><a class="more" href="/linux/change_terminal">View page</a></div> </div> </div> <div class="services"> <div class="service-left grid_6 alpha"> <h2>System startup process</h2> <img src="/sites/all/themes/corporateclean/mockup/seo.png" style="float:left; padding:0 10px 0 0;"/>Linux system startup process involves several important steps that Linux users need to know. This is vital in case of system boot up failure. By learning how Linux process start up, user can troubleshoot a broken system. <div style="clear:both; padding:10px 0 0 0; text-align:right;"><a class="more" href="/linux/startup">View page</a></div> </div> <div class="service-right grid_6 omega"> <h2>Linux file system structure overview</h2> <img src="/sites/all/themes/corporateclean/mockup/web-applications.png" style="float:left; padding:0 10px 0 0;"/>Linux file system structure overview is an introduction to file system directory hierarchy in Linux system. A Linux beginner might get confuse between Linux file system structure and Linux filesystem types. <div style="clear:both; padding:10px 0 0 0; text-align:right;"><a class="more" href="/linux/filesystem">View page</a></div> </div> </div> <div class="services"> <div class="service-left grid_6 alpha"> <h2>Filesystem types</h2> <img src="/sites/all/themes/corporateclean/mockup/web-design.png" style="float:left; padding:0 10px 0 0;"/>In this tutorial, we are going look at some Linux filesystems such as ext, ext2, ext3, Reiserfsand and other filesystems that Linux supports such as msdos, umsdos, vfat, proc, nfs, iso9660, hpfs, sysv, smb, ncpfs. <div style="clear:both; padding:10px 0 0 0; text-align:right;"><a class="more" href="/linux-basics/filesystem-types">View page</a></div> </div> </div></div></div></div><!-- google_ad_section_end --><div class="field field-name-field-tags field-type-taxonomy-term-reference field-label-above"><div class="field-label">Tags:&nbsp;</div><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even" rel="dc:subject"><a href="/taxonomy/term/1" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">linux basics</a></div></div></div> Tue, 10 Dec 2013 05:34:44 +0000 jinlusuh 91 at http://www.basicconfig.com http://www.basicconfig.com/linux/linux-basics-tutorial#comments Linux filesystem types http://www.basicconfig.com/linux/filesystem-types <!-- google_ad_section_start --><div class="field field-name-body field-type-text-with-summary field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even" property="content:encoded"><p>If you read previous article, <a href="/linux/filesystem" target="_blank">Linux basics - Linux file system structure overview</a>, you should know the different between <b>Linux file system</b> and <b>Linux filesystem</b>. In this tutorial, we are going look at some Linux filesystems such as ext, ext2, ext3, Reiserfsand and other filesystems that Linux supports such as msdos, umsdos, vfat, proc, nfs, iso9660, hpfs, sysv, smb, ncpfs.</p> <p>We can view Linux user's manual using <i>man fs</i> command in the command line terminal or virtual terminal console. Here is the complete user's manual page open from Ubuntu:</p> <table><tr><td><code> <span style="color:red;">minix</span> is the filesystem used in the Minix operating system, the<br /> first to run under Linux. It has a number of shortcomings: a<br /> 64MB partition size limit, short filenames, a single<br /> timestamp, etc. It remains useful for floppies and RAM<br /> disks.<br /><br /><span style="color:red;">ext</span> is an elaborate extension of the minix filesystem. It has<br /> been completely superseded by the second version of the<br /> extended filesystem (ext2) and has been removed from the<br /> kernel (in 2.1.21).<br /><br /><span style="color:red;">ext2</span> is the high performance disk filesystem used by Linux for<br /> fixed disks as well as removable media. The second extended<br /> filesystem was designed as an extension of the extended file<br /> system (ext). ext2 offers the best performance (in terms of<br /> speed and CPU usage) of the filesystems supported under<br /> Linux.<br /><br /><span style="color:red;">ext3</span> is a journaling version of the ext2 filesystem. It is easy<br /> to switch back and forth between ext2 and ext3.<br /><br /><span style="color:red;">Reiserfs</span> is a journaling filesystem, designed by Hans Reiser, that<br /> was integrated into Linux in kernel 2.4.1.<br /><br /><span style="color:red;">XFS</span> is a journaling filesystem, developed by SGI, that was<br /> integrated into Linux in kernel 2.4.20.<br /><br /><span style="color:red;">JFS</span> is a journaling filesystem, developed by IBM, that was<br /> integrated into Linux in kernel 2.4.24.<br /><br /><span style="color:red;">xiafs</span> was designed and implemented to be a stable, safe filesystem<br /> by extending the Minix filesystem code. It provides the<br /> basic most requested features without undue complexity. The<br /> xia filesystem is no longer actively developed or<br /> maintained. It was removed from the kernel in 2.1.21.<br /><br /><span style="color:red;">msdos</span> is the filesystem used by DOS, Windows, and some OS/2<br /> computers. msdos filenames can be no longer than 8<br /> characters, followed by an optional period and 3 character<br /> extension.<br /><br /><span style="color:red;">umsdos</span> is an extended DOS filesystem used by Linux. It adds<br /> capability for long filenames, UID/GID, POSIX permissions,<br /> and special files (devices, named pipes, etc.) under the DOS<br /> filesystem, without sacrificing compatibility with DOS.<br /><br /><span style="color:red;">vfat</span> is an extended DOS filesystem used by Microsoft Windows95<br /> and Windows NT. VFAT adds the capability to use long<br /> filenames under the MSDOS filesystem.<br /><br /><span style="color:red;">proc</span> is a pseudo filesystem which is used as an interface to<br /> kernel data structures rather than reading and interpreting<br /> /dev/kmem. In particular, its files do not take disk space.<br /> See proc(5).<br /><br /><span style="color:red;">iso9660</span> is a CD-ROM filesystem type conforming to the ISO 9660<br /> standard.<br /><br /><span style="color:red;">High Sierra</span><br /> Linux supports High Sierra, the precursor to the ISO<br /> 9660 standard for CD-ROM filesystems. It is<br /> automatically recognized within the iso9660 file-<br /> system support under Linux.<br /><br /><span style="color:red;">Rock Ridge</span><br /> Linux also supports the System Use Sharing Protocol<br /> records specified by the Rock Ridge Interchange<br /> Protocol. They are used to further describe the files<br /> in the iso9660 filesystem to a Unix host, and provide<br /> information such as long filenames, UID/GID, POSIX<br /> permissions, and devices. It is automatically<br /> recognized within the iso9660 file-system support<br /> under Linux.<br /><br /><span style="color:red;">hpfs</span> is the High Performance Filesystem, used in OS/2. This file<br /> system is read-only under Linux due to the lack of available<br /> documentation.<br /><br /><span style="color:red;">sysv</span> is an implementation of the SystemV/Coherent filesystem for<br /> Linux. It implements all of Xenix FS, SystemV/386 FS, and<br /> Coherent FS.<br /><br /><span style="color:red;">nfs</span> is the network filesystem used to access disks located on<br /> remote computers.<br /><br /><span style="color:red;">smb</span> is a network filesystem that supports the SMB protocol, used<br /> by Windows for Workgroups, Windows NT, and Lan Manager.<br /><br /> To use smb fs, you need a special mount program, which can be<br /> found in the ksmbfs package, found at<br /> ftp://sunsite.unc.edu/pub/Linux/system/Filesystems/smbfs.<br /><br /><span style="color:red;">ncpfs</span> is a network filesystem that supports the NCP protocol, used<br /> by Novell NetWare.<br /><br /> To use ncpfs, you need special programs, which can be found<br /> at ftp://linux01.gwdg.de/pub/ncpfs.<br /></code></td> </tr></table><p>You can build a Linux filesystem on a partition using the <i>mkfs</i> command. However, if you are planning to setup the whole hard disk drive, using the <i>fdisk</i> command is a lot easier. You can find fdisk guide in the <a href="/slackware_partitioning_fdisk" target="_blank">Slackware hard disk partition with fdisk</a> tutorial. The filesystem has to be mounted before you can use it in the Linux system.</p> </div></div></div><!-- google_ad_section_end --><div class="field field-name-field-tags field-type-taxonomy-term-reference field-label-above"><div class="field-label">Tags:&nbsp;</div><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even" rel="dc:subject"><a href="/taxonomy/term/1" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">linux basics</a></div></div></div> Sun, 31 Jan 2010 03:39:42 +0000 jinlusuh 17 at http://www.basicconfig.com http://www.basicconfig.com/linux/filesystem-types#comments Filesystem types http://www.basicconfig.com/linux-basics/filesystem-types <!-- google_ad_section_start --><div class="field field-name-body field-type-text-with-summary field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even" property="content:encoded"><p>If you read previous article, <a href="/linux/filesystem" target="_blank">Linux basics - Linux file system structure overview</a>, you should know the different between <b>Linux file system</b> and <b>Linux filesystem</b>. In this tutorial, we are going look at some Linux filesystems such as ext, ext2, ext3, Reiserfsand and other filesystems that Linux supports such as msdos, umsdos, vfat, proc, nfs, iso9660, hpfs, sysv, smb, ncpfs.</p> <p>We can view Linux user's manual using <i>man fs</i> command in the command line terminal or virtual terminal console. Here is the complete user's manual page open from Ubuntu:</p> <table><tr><td><code> minix is the filesystem used in the Minix operating system, the<br /> first to run under Linux. It has a number of shortcomings: a<br /> 64MB partition size limit, short filenames, a single<br /> timestamp, etc. It remains useful for floppies and RAM<br /> disks.<br /><br /> ext is an elaborate extension of the minix filesystem. It has<br /> been completely superseded by the second version of the<br /> extended filesystem (ext2) and has been removed from the<br /> kernel (in 2.1.21).<br /><br /> ext2 is the high performance disk filesystem used by Linux for<br /> fixed disks as well as removable media. The second extended<br /> filesystem was designed as an extension of the extended file<br /> system (ext). ext2 offers the best performance (in terms of<br /> speed and CPU usage) of the filesystems supported under<br /> Linux.<br /><br /> ext3 is a journaling version of the ext2 filesystem. It is easy<br /> to switch back and forth between ext2 and ext3.<br /><br /> Reiserfs is a journaling filesystem, designed by Hans Reiser, that<br /> was integrated into Linux in kernel 2.4.1.<br /><br /> XFS is a journaling filesystem, developed by SGI, that was<br /> integrated into Linux in kernel 2.4.20.<br /><br /> JFS is a journaling filesystem, developed by IBM, that was<br /> integrated into Linux in kernel 2.4.24.<br /><br /> xiafs was designed and implemented to be a stable, safe filesystem<br /> by extending the Minix filesystem code. It provides the<br /> basic most requested features without undue complexity. The<br /> xia filesystem is no longer actively developed or<br /> maintained. It was removed from the kernel in 2.1.21.<br /><br /> msdos is the filesystem used by DOS, Windows, and some OS/2<br /> computers. msdos filenames can be no longer than 8<br /> characters, followed by an optional period and 3 character<br /> extension.<br /><br /> umsdos is an extended DOS filesystem used by Linux. It adds<br /> capability for long filenames, UID/GID, POSIX permissions,<br /> and special files (devices, named pipes, etc.) under the DOS<br /> filesystem, without sacrificing compatibility with DOS.<br /><br /> vfat is an extended DOS filesystem used by Microsoft Windows95<br /> and Windows NT. VFAT adds the capability to use long<br /> filenames under the MSDOS filesystem.<br /><br /> proc is a pseudo filesystem which is used as an interface to<br /> kernel data structures rather than reading and interpreting<br /> /dev/kmem. In particular, its files do not take disk space.<br /> See proc(5).<br /><br /> iso9660 is a CD-ROM filesystem type conforming to the ISO 9660<br /> standard.<br /><br /> High Sierra<br /> Linux supports High Sierra, the precursor to the ISO<br /> 9660 standard for CD-ROM filesystems. It is<br /> automatically recognized within the iso9660 file-<br /> system support under Linux.<br /><br /> Rock Ridge<br /> Linux also supports the System Use Sharing Protocol<br /> records specified by the Rock Ridge Interchange<br /> Protocol. They are used to further describe the files<br /> in the iso9660 filesystem to a Unix host, and provide<br /> information such as long filenames, UID/GID, POSIX<br /> permissions, and devices. It is automatically<br /> recognized within the iso9660 file-system support<br /> under Linux.<br /><br /> hpfs is the High Performance Filesystem, used in OS/2. This file<br /> system is read-only under Linux due to the lack of available<br /> documentation.<br /><br /> sysv is an implementation of the SystemV/Coherent filesystem for<br /> Linux. It implements all of Xenix FS, SystemV/386 FS, and<br /> Coherent FS.<br /><br /> nfs is the network filesystem used to access disks located on<br /> remote computers.<br /><br /> smb is a network filesystem that supports the SMB protocol, used<br /> by Windows for Workgroups, Windows NT, and Lan Manager.<br /><br /> To use smb fs, you need a special mount program, which can be<br /> found in the ksmbfs package, found at<br /> ftp://sunsite.unc.edu/pub/Linux/system/Filesystems/smbfs.<br /><br /> ncpfs is a network filesystem that supports the NCP protocol, used<br /> by Novell NetWare.<br /><br /> To use ncpfs, you need special programs, which can be found<br /> at ftp://linux01.gwdg.de/pub/ncpfs.<br /></code></td> </tr></table><p>You can build a Linux filesystem on a partition using the <i>mkfs</i> command. However, if you are planning to setup the whole hard disk drive, using the <i>fdisk</i> command is a lot easier. You can find fdisk guide in the <a href="/slackware_partitioning_fdisk" target="_blank">Slackware hard disk partition with fdisk</a> tutorial. The filesystem has to be mounted before you can use it in the Linux system.</p> </div></div></div><!-- google_ad_section_end --><div class="field field-name-field-tags field-type-taxonomy-term-reference field-label-above"><div class="field-label">Tags:&nbsp;</div><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even" rel="dc:subject"><a href="/taxonomy/term/1" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">linux basics</a></div></div></div> Sun, 31 Jan 2010 03:39:42 +0000 jinlusuh 218 at http://www.basicconfig.com http://www.basicconfig.com/linux-basics/filesystem-types#comments Linux basic commands tutorial http://www.basicconfig.com/linux-basic-commands-tutorial <!-- google_ad_section_start --><div class="field field-name-body field-type-text-with-summary field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even" property="content:encoded"><h2>Basic Linux commands and essential programs</h2> <p>You have learned some Linux commands such as logout, reboot and shutdown commands in the previous section. Those are the most basic Linux commands a user needs to know in order to use Linux. In this tutorial, you are going to learn some more Linux basic commands and essential Linux programs to help you explore your Linux system.</p> <p>Linux distribution such as Ubuntu has developed a desktop Linux, which includes almost all graphical tools needed to configure Linux applications in x-window. That means, new Linux user doesn't need to learn Linux commands to start using Linux. However, the fact that Linux is a multi-user and multi-tasking operating system means learning Linux commands let user to take full advantage of Linux potentials. The x-window such as KDE or GNOME is just another application in Linux. If something goes wrong, you need to switch to the Linux command line terminal to troubleshoot the problem. Ask all Linux users, they would certainly recommend learning Linux commands, at least some basic commands in Linux.</p> <p>The first Linux basic command you are going to learn is <em>man</em> command. The man command is a command to display manual or documentation included in the Linux system. It is the most useful command in Linux that will help you use and understand other commands available in the system. You can find more information about man command in <a href="/linuxcmd/man">Linux man command</a> basic tutorial which was written for a Linux beginner.</p> <p>The second Linux basic command which every Linux beginner should know is the <em>uname</em> command. The uname command prints information about Linux system. This command is really useful when we are checking our Linux system's kernel version, name, etc. See more information and examples of uname command in <a href="/linux/uname_command">Linux uname command</a> tutorial.</p> <p>Another useful Linux basic command is the Linux <em>env</em> command. The env command let us check, add and modify a Linux user's working environment such as shell, path, mail and so on. These are basic things you should know about your Linux system. See more information about env command in <a href="/linux/linux_environment_variables">Linux environment variables</a> tutorial.</p> <p>Linux command line interface is not about typing everything all around. If you are lucky to have seen a Linux guru doing his job in Linux command line interface, then you probably think that he's not from this world. Is he typing that fast? Moving between terminals, pressing keys, you can't barely seen what it is. Wow...</p> <p>Here I'm going to reveal their secrets so you too can look like a guru and perhaps be one in the future. The secret number one is called <em>Linux history</em>. Linux keeps all your running command in a file called .history. Check this basic Linux tutorial about <a href="/linux/linux_bash_history">bash history</a> and learn how you can re-used previous command you typed in Linux command line terminal. </p> <p>Secret number two is called <em>Linux automatic command completion</em>. It is another favourite tool used by almost all Linux users. It is a program that help identify what you are going to type in Linux command line and complete the command, words or sentence for you. Learn more about this cool Linux feature in <a href="/linux/linux_automatic_command_completion_tutorial">Linux automatic command completion</a> tutorial.</p> <p>Secret number three is the Linux <em>shortcut keys</em>. Linux has several useful shortcut keys by default that you can use in command line terminal. Learn these shortcut keys or key sequences available in Linux shortcut keys tutorial.</p> <p>That's the basic magic you should learn as a Linux beginner. It's probably enough to impress other gui fellows of yours.</p> <p>Let's continue to other Linux basic commands. The very important Linux command and perhaps the mostly used command in Linux system is the <b>ls</b> command. It is used to view directory contents. Learn how to use ls command to view hidden files, print result in different format, print directory only and many more in <a href="/linux/linux_directory_listing_using_ls_command">Linux directory listing using ls command</a> tutorial.<p> <p>When learning all basic Linux commands above, we have come across the <b>Linux cd command</b>. A very simple command yet plays very big role in Linux command line terminal. Check out <a href="/linux/linux_cd_command_tutorial">Linux cd command - explore Linux directory file system</a> to learn what an important command it is.</p> <p>Here are more useful basic Linux command list that can help you working in the Linux command line terminal:</p> <p>1) <a href="/linux/linux-clear-command-tutorial">Linux clear command tutorial</a> - Learn Linux clear command which is used to clear terminal screen and see example of the command usage.</p> <p>2) <a href="/linux/linux-date-command-tutorial">Linux date command tutorial</a> - Learn more about this important Linux command. The date command can be used to view as well as edit date and time in Linux command line terminal is explained with examples in real situation.</p> <p>3) <a href="/linux/linux-who-command-tutorial">Linux who command</a> - Prints information about current login session. The who command offers some options that user can use to see more details about users such as login time, terminal used and process id. Check this out!</p> <p>4) <a href="/linux-basic/linux-redirection-tutorial">Linux redirection tutorial</a> - Redirection in Linux means sending command output to another location or file. It is a great support for Linux command.</p> <p>5) <a href="/linux-basic/linux-pipe-tutorial">Linux pipe tutorial</a> - Linux pipe operator, which is the | symbol offers great benefits when working in Linux command line terminal. It can be used to combine Linux commands and manipulate the command output.</p> <p>All Linux basic command tutorials above should expose you to the basic concept of running commands in Linux system. However, those commands only prepare you to explore Linux file system. To do a real administration job using Linux commands, you can continue to the next Linux command's topic and learn how to manage Linux user account.</p> <h2>Linux basic commands to manage Linux user account</h2> <p>Linux and Unix commands can be group into several sections depends on the task. Here's the Linux user account related commands list. It contains every Linux commands needed to manage Linux user account.</p> <p>1) <a href="/linux/adduser">Linux adduser command</a> - This is the command to create a new user account from Linux or Unix shell(terminal). Description and step by step example of Linux "adduser" command. </p> <br /> <p>2) <a href="/linux/useradd">Linux useradd command</a> - The useradd command is common in Unix and Unix-based operating system. This command is use to create a new user account or update default new user information. Highly useful command for system administrator, so new system administrator, check out this tutorial.</p> <p>3) <a href="/linux/delete-user-account-using-linux-userdel-command">Linux userdel command</a> - Learn how to use the Linux userdel command to remove user account from the system. This command will also delete related files in the account. A simple example on how to use userdel command is in here. So check this out.</p> <p>4) <a href="/linux/finger">Linux finger command</a> - An example on how to use a Linux finger command. The finger command is use to view account user information. The description with example in this tutorial should make user understand better about Linux finger.</p> <p>5) <a href="/linux/last">Linux last command</a> - This command is used to show last users logged on in the system. Learn how to use this command in an easy to understand step by step examples.</p> <p>6) <a href="/linux/grpadd">Linux groupadd command</a> - Another important task regarding Linux user account is to manage user group. Creating user group is one of the task Linux or Unix system administrator do regularly. Practice how to create a new group in Linux Bourne again shell (bash) with this tutorial.</p> <p>7) <a href="/linux/edit_modify_linux_user_account_information_usermod_command">Linux usermod command</a> - Here's the most useful command in user account related commands group. The Linux usermod command is use to modify a user account in the system. No doubt this is the command which does many things. Check out this tutorials and learn what regular options used with usermod command.</p> <h2>Linux basic commands to manage file and directory</h2> <p>Another important topic to learn for a beginner to master Linux is how to handle file and directory in the Linux system. Just like using windows operating system, you need to create new files, create new directory, remove files, remove directories, change file name, copy directory and so on.</p> <p>Manage files and directories in Linux system is an administration job and also a part of system security. Every file and directory in Linux belongs to a certain owner and group owner. They also have permissions applied. You need to understand both, Linux ownership and Linux permissions before you can manage files and directories in Linux system. </p> <p>Here is the Linux command list on how to manage Linux file and directory system. They cover most of the Linux basics to handle files and directory including file permissions and ownerships, which is the most important topic here.</p> <p>1) <a href="/linux/mkdir">Linux mkdir command</a> - A basic Linux tutorial with examples on how to use Linux mkdir command to create new directories in Linux system. A simple explanation for a Linux beginner.</p> <p>2) <a href="/linux/delete-directory-linux-rmdir-command">Linux rmdir command</a> - A basic Linux guide with examples on how to use Linux rmdir command to delete directory in Linux command line terminal. Check this out!.</p> <p>3) <a href="/linux/mv">Linux mv command - move or rename files and directory in Linux</a> - Move or change location of a file in Linux using mv command. You can also use Linux mv command to rename a file or a directory.</p> <p>4) <a href="/linux/how_to_copy_files_directory_linux">Linux cp command - how to copy file and directory in Linux</a> - The cp command is used to copy file or directory to another location or directory in Linux system. A great yet simple tool to backup files. Check out regular options used with cp command in this step by step tutorial.</p> <p>5) <a href="/linux/linux_scp_command_example">Linux scp command - copy file and directory from remote computer</a> - What scp does is remotely copying files from other system plus safety transfer. Learn this useful command here.</p> <p>6) <a href="/linux/rm">Linux rm command - delete file and directory in Linux</a> - The <b>rm</b> command is used to remove files or directory. In Linux system there is no <b>del</b> or <b>delete</b> command. So user who familiar with windows or dos command prompt, please take note. It's <em>rm</em> not <em>del</em> command. Check this tutorial for more information about how to delete file or directory in Linux system.</p> <p>7) <a href="/linux/linux-locate-command-tutorial">Linux locate command tutorial</a> - Linux <em>locate</em> command is a search utility in Linux. It can be found by default in almost all Linux distributions including Slackware and Ubuntu Linux. This tutorial is a basic locate command guide for a new Linux user. Check this out!</p> <h2>Linux basic commands to manage file system</h2> <p>These are another useful Linux basic commands for beginner to learn and explore the Linux system. Linux file system related commands are those commands you need to deal with file system such as mounting and unmounting a file system (such as windows FAT file system), view file system and hard disk space and many more.</p> <p>Here is the list of regular used Linux commands to handle file system in Linux:</p> <p>1) <a href="/linux/mount">Linux mount command</a> - Linux mount command is used to mount a file system. Linux does not mount file system automatically when you insert a thumb drive or external hard disk. This is because mounting a file system involves security and permission. Read more information in this tutorial.</p> <p>2) <a href="/linux/linux_fdisk_command_check_hard_disk_partitions">Linux fdisk command - check hard disk partitions</a> - The Linux fdisk command is a popular tool used to create hard disk partitions. However, fdisk command also can be used to check hard disk partitions on the running Linux system.</p> <p>3) <a href="/linux/df">Linux df command - monitor Linux hard disk usage</a> - Report file system disk space usage with Linux df command. See an example on how to use df command in Linux system.</p> <h2>Linux basic commands to manage Linux processes</h2> <p>Linux processes (similar to Windows processes) which also called Linux services are programs running when Linux is started. This is an easy jargon and most used recently to help less confusing Linux beginner (which mostly have Windows background). However, the term 'daemon' is widely used in Linux community to refer the Linux services.</p> <p>Here is the Linux command list that every user should know to view and manage Linux processes:</p> <p>1) <a href="/linux/process">Linux ps command</a> - Report a snapshot of current processes. Learn more about Linux ps command such as different options in Unix, BSD and how Linux process is different from Windows process. </p> <p>2) <a href="/linux/restart_shutdown_linux_system">Linux reboot command</a> - Restart Linux system. Check out this Linux tutorial on how to bring down Linux system.</p></div></div></div><!-- google_ad_section_end --><div class="field field-name-field-tags field-type-taxonomy-term-reference field-label-above"><div class="field-label">Tags:&nbsp;</div><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even" rel="dc:subject"><a href="/taxonomy/term/1" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">linux basics</a></div><div class="field-item odd" rel="dc:subject"><a href="/taxonomy/term/3" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">linux commands</a></div></div></div> Fri, 25 Sep 2009 03:32:17 +0000 jinlusuh 25 at http://www.basicconfig.com http://www.basicconfig.com/linux-basic-commands-tutorial#comments Basic Linux tutorials for beginner http://www.basicconfig.com/basic-linux-tutorials-for-beginner <!-- google_ad_section_start --><div class="field field-name-body field-type-text-with-summary field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even" property="content:encoded"><h2>Overview</h2> <p>If you are a Linux beginner, here are some basic tutorials to help you understand more about Linux system.</p> <div class="services"> <div class="service-left grid_6 alpha"> <h2>A guide for Linux beginner</h2> <img src="/sites/all/themes/corporateclean/mockup/web-design.png" style="float:left; padding:0 10px 0 0;"/>The Linux tutorials are collections of Linux theory and practical guides base on real imitation, done on Slackware and Ubuntu server distributions of Linux operating system. <div style="clear:both; padding:10px 0 0 0; text-align:right;"><a class="more" href="linux_tutorials">View page</a></div> </div> <div class="service-right grid_6 omega"> <h2>Basics Linux command tutorial</h2> <img src="/sites/all/themes/corporateclean/mockup/graphic-design.png" style="float:left; padding:0 10px 0 0;"/>Although many Linux distributions nowadays offer great and powerful graphical user interface window (GUI) tools, Linux commands still proved to be very useful and efficient in certain circumstances. <div style="clear:both; padding:10px 0 0 0; text-align:right;"><a class="more" href="linuxcmd">View page</a></div> </div> </div> <div class="services"> <div class="service-left grid_6 alpha"> <h2>Introduction to Linux administration</h2> <img src="/sites/all/themes/corporateclean/mockup/seo.png" style="float:left; padding:0 10px 0 0;"/>Linux administration means everything about Linux such as Linux installation, create and manage user accounts, permissions, ownerships, hardware, software, data management and so on. <div style="clear:both; padding:10px 0 0 0; text-align:right;"><a class="more" href="introduction_to_linux_administration">View page</a></div> </div> <div class="service-right grid_6 omega"> <h2>Slackware learning guidelines</h2> <img src="/sites/all/themes/corporateclean/mockup/web-applications.png" style="float:left; padding:0 10px 0 0;"/>Slackware is a great Linux distribution for a beginner to start learning Linux operating system. Slackware enables user to fully control the operating system. Some people say that Slackware is a little hard for a beginner. <div style="clear:both; padding:10px 0 0 0; text-align:right;"><a class="more" href="basic_slackware_linux_learning_guidelines_for_beginner">View page</a></div> </div> </div> <div class="services"> <div class="service-left grid_6 alpha"> <h2>Linux software guide for beginner</h2> <img src="/sites/all/themes/corporateclean/mockup/mobile-applications.png" style="float:left; padding:0 10px 0 0;"/>Linux is a fast growing operating system. It is a great server operating system solutions for small businesses and large organisations as well. Nowadays, Linux has become a popular desktop operating system. <div style="clear:both; padding:10px 0 0 0; text-align:right;"><a class="more" href="linux-software">View page</a></div> </div> </div></div></div></div><!-- google_ad_section_end --><div class="field field-name-field-tags field-type-taxonomy-term-reference field-label-above"><div class="field-label">Tags:&nbsp;</div><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even" rel="dc:subject"><a href="/taxonomy/term/1" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">linux basics</a></div></div></div> Fri, 11 Sep 2009 16:30:44 +0000 jinlusuh 129 at http://www.basicconfig.com http://www.basicconfig.com/basic-linux-tutorials-for-beginner#comments Linux pipe tutorial http://www.basicconfig.com/linux-basic/linux-pipe-tutorial <!-- google_ad_section_start --><div class="field field-name-body field-type-text-with-summary field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even" property="content:encoded"><p>Linux pipe operator, which is the | symbol offers great benefits when working in Linux command line terminal. It can be used to combine Linux commands and manipulate the command output. Maybe you start thinking that it is a bit advanced for a new user who just learned a few Linux commands and better skip learning it now because it's not very helping for a Linux beginner. Believe me, the sooner you learn it, the more you'll benefits from it.</p> <p>This tutorial will introduce a very basic Linux pipe usage so that a new user can start using it while learning Linux basic commands.</p> <p>Let's see the first example on how to use pipe to combine Linux command and manipulate the command's output.</p> <table><tr><td><code>kucing@ubuntu:~$ <span style="color:red;">ls /etc/ | grep ld.so</span><br /> ld.so.cache<br /> ld.so.conf<br /> ld.so.conf.d<br /> kucing@ubuntu:~$<br /></code></td> </tr></table><p>In the example above, we use ls command to view content of /etc directory. Because the /etc directory has many files and directories, we use Linux pipe (|) to send the output to the next command which is the grep command to grab <b>term</b> that we want (ls.so).</p> <p>Here is another example of how to manipulate command's output using Linux pipe to send it to another command:</p> <table><tr><td><code>kucing@ubuntu:~$ <span style="color:red;">dmesg | less</span><br /> [ 0.000000] Initializing cgroup subsys cpuset<br /> [ 0.000000] Initializing cgroup subsys cpu<br /> [ 0.000000] Linux version 2.6.27-14-generic (buildd@rothera) (gcc version 4.3.2 (Ubuntu 4.3.2-1ubuntu11) )<br /> #1 SMP Tue Jun 30 19:57:39 UTC 2009 (Ubuntu 2.6.27-14.35-generic)<br /> [ 0.000000] BIOS-provided physical RAM map:<br /> [ 0.000000] BIOS-e820: 0000000000000000 - 000000000009f800 (usable)<br /> [ 0.000000] BIOS-e820: 000000000009f800 - 00000000000a0000 (reserved)<br /> [ 0.000000] BIOS-e820: 00000000000dc000 - 0000000000100000 (reserved)<br /> [ 0.000000] BIOS-e820: 0000000000100000 - 000000001f680000 (usable)<br /> [ 0.000000] BIOS-e820: 000000001f680000 - 000000001f700000 (ACPI NVS)<br /> [ 0.000000] BIOS-e820: 000000001f700000 - 0000000020000000 (reserved)<br /> [ 0.000000] BIOS-e820: 00000000e0000000 - 00000000f0000000 (reserved)<br /> [ 0.000000] BIOS-e820: 00000000fec00000 - 00000000fec10000 (reserved)<br /> [ 0.000000] BIOS-e820: 00000000fed00000 - 00000000fed00400 (reserved)<br /> [ 0.000000] BIOS-e820: 00000000fed14000 - 00000000fed1a000 (reserved)<br /> [ 0.000000] BIOS-e820: 00000000fed1c000 - 00000000fed90000 (reserved)<br /> [ 0.000000] BIOS-e820: 00000000fee00000 - 00000000fee01000 (reserved)<br /> [ 0.000000] BIOS-e820: 00000000ff000000 - 0000000100000000 (reserved)<br /> [ 0.000000] DMI present.<br /> [ 0.000000] last_pfn = 0x1f680 max_arch_pfn = 0x100000<br /> [ 0.000000] kernel direct mapping tables up to 1f680000 @ 7000-d000<br /> [ 0.000000] RAMDISK: 1ee9c000 - 1f66fa50<br /></code></td> </tr></table><p>We use <em>dmesg</em> command in the example above to view Linux bootup messages. To let us read the message line by line, we use Linux pipe to pass the dmesg output to the less command.</p> <p>Those are two examples of Linux pipe which has been used regularly by Linux users especially system administrators when working in Linux command line terminal. It'll be a great help for Linux new user to learn Linux and explore Linux file system for sure.</p> <p>Back to <a href="/linux-basic-commands-tutorial">Linux basic commands main page.</a><a></a></p> </div></div></div><!-- google_ad_section_end --><div class="field field-name-field-tags field-type-taxonomy-term-reference field-label-above"><div class="field-label">Tags:&nbsp;</div><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even" rel="dc:subject"><a href="/taxonomy/term/1" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">linux basics</a></div></div></div> Sat, 18 Jul 2009 14:55:35 +0000 jinlusuh 217 at http://www.basicconfig.com http://www.basicconfig.com/linux-basic/linux-pipe-tutorial#comments Linux redirection tutorial http://www.basicconfig.com/linux/linux-redirection-tutorial <!-- google_ad_section_start --><div class="field field-name-body field-type-text-with-summary field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even" property="content:encoded"><p>When issuing a command in Linux, we get the result output on the screen monitor. We can send the command result to a file, for example using Linux redirection. Redirection in Linux means sending command output to another location or file. It is a great support for Linux command. Linux redirection is represented by &gt; operator.</p> <p>Linux redirection is quite an important command when working in Linux command line terminal. Here is an example of what redirect command can do:</p> <table><tr><td><code>kucing@ubuntu:~$ mkdir examples<br /> kucing@ubuntu:~$ <span style="color:red;">man man &gt; examples/linux-manual.txt</span><br /> kucing@ubuntu:~$ ls examples/<br /> linux-manual.txt<br /> kucing@ubuntu:~$<br /></code></td> </tr></table><p>The example above shows redirect prints the output of <em>man</em> command to a file. We can use redirect to manipulates the STDOUT and prints the result to other destination. We can also use redirection to create a new file in Linux. For this purpose, we use Linux <em>cat</em> command. See example below:</p> <table><tr><td><code>kucing@ubuntu:~$ <span style="color:red;">cat &gt; examples/new-file.txt</span><br /> This is a an example on how to use Linux redirection to create a new file in Linux. We use Linux cat command and redirection.<br /><br /> kucing@ubuntu:~$ ls examples/<br /> linux-manual.txt new-file.txt<br /> kucing@ubuntu:~$ <span style="color:red;">cat examples/new-file.txt</span><br /> This is a an example on how to use Linux redirection to create a new file in Linux. We use Linux cat command and redirection.<br /> kucing@ubuntu:~$<br /></code></td> </tr></table><p>We can also use Linux redirection to add or append content to a file. Use double redirection operator (&gt;&gt;) for this job. See example below:</p> <table><tr><td><code>kucing@ubuntu:~$ <span style="color:red;">cat &gt;&gt; examples/new-file.txt</span><br /> This is a new content append to this file.<br /> kucing@ubuntu:~$ <span style="color:red;">cat examples/new-file.txt </span><br /> This is a an example on how to use Linux redirection to create a new file in Linux. We use Linux cat command and redirection.<br /><span style="color:blue;">This is a new content append to this file.</span><br /> kucing@ubuntu:~$<br /></code></td> </tr></table><p>As you can see, the Linux redirection is quite interesting. It can be really interesting if you are developing a program or configuring a Linux server. You can use Linux redirection to keep all results and errors in a dedicated directory. You can also use redirection to ignore error or warning by sending the output to /dev/null.</p> <table><tr><td><code>kucing@ubuntu:~$ <span style="color:red;">/etc/init.d/apache2 start 2&gt; examples/errors.txt</span><br /> kucing@ubuntu:~$ <span style="color:red;">/etc/init.d/apache2 start 2&gt; /dev/null</span><br /></code></td> </tr></table><p>That's all for now.</p> <p>Back to <a href="/linux-basic-commands-tutorial">Linux basic commands main page.</a><a></a></p> </div></div></div><!-- google_ad_section_end --><div class="field field-name-field-tags field-type-taxonomy-term-reference field-label-above"><div class="field-label">Tags:&nbsp;</div><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even" rel="dc:subject"><a href="/taxonomy/term/1" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">linux basics</a></div></div></div> Mon, 13 Jul 2009 04:13:02 +0000 jinlusuh 36 at http://www.basicconfig.com http://www.basicconfig.com/linux/linux-redirection-tutorial#comments Linux redirection tutorial http://www.basicconfig.com/linux-basic/linux-redirection-tutorial <!-- google_ad_section_start --><div class="field field-name-body field-type-text-with-summary field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even" property="content:encoded"><p>When issuing a command in Linux, we get the result output on the screen monitor. We can send the command result to a file, for example using Linux redirection. Redirection in Linux means sending command output to another location or file. It is a great support for Linux command. Linux redirection is represented by &gt; operator.</p> <p>Linux redirection is quite an important command when working in Linux command line terminal. Here is an example of what redirect command can do:</p> <table><tr><td><code>kucing@ubuntu:~$ mkdir examples<br /> kucing@ubuntu:~$ <span style="color:red;">man man &gt; examples/linux-manual.txt</span><br /> kucing@ubuntu:~$ ls examples/<br /> linux-manual.txt<br /> kucing@ubuntu:~$<br /></code></td> </tr></table><p>The example above shows redirect prints the output of <em>man</em> command to a file. We can use redirect to manipulates the STDOUT and prints the result to other destination. We can also use redirection to create a new file in Linux. For this purpose, we use Linux <em>cat</em> command. See example below:</p> <table><tr><td><code>kucing@ubuntu:~$ <span style="color:red;">cat &gt; examples/new-file.txt</span><br /> This is a an example on how to use Linux redirection to create a new file in Linux. We use Linux cat command and redirection.<br /><br /> kucing@ubuntu:~$ ls examples/<br /> linux-manual.txt new-file.txt<br /> kucing@ubuntu:~$ <span style="color:red;">cat examples/new-file.txt</span><br /> This is a an example on how to use Linux redirection to create a new file in Linux. We use Linux cat command and redirection.<br /> kucing@ubuntu:~$<br /></code></td> </tr></table><p>We can also use Linux redirection to add or append content to a file. Use double redirection operator (&gt;&gt;) for this job. See example below:</p> <table><tr><td><code>kucing@ubuntu:~$ <span style="color:red;">cat &gt;&gt; examples/new-file.txt</span><br /> This is a new content append to this file.<br /> kucing@ubuntu:~$ <span style="color:red;">cat examples/new-file.txt </span><br /> This is a an example on how to use Linux redirection to create a new file in Linux. We use Linux cat command and redirection.<br /><span style="color:blue;">This is a new content append to this file.</span><br /> kucing@ubuntu:~$<br /></code></td> </tr></table><p>As you can see, the Linux redirection is quite interesting. It can be really interesting if you are developing a program or configuring a Linux server. You can use Linux redirection to keep all results and errors in a dedicated directory. You can also use redirection to ignore error or warning by sending the output to /dev/null.</p> <table><tr><td><code>kucing@ubuntu:~$ <span style="color:red;">/etc/init.d/apache2 start 2&gt; examples/errors.txt</span><br /> kucing@ubuntu:~$ <span style="color:red;">/etc/init.d/apache2 start 2&gt; /dev/null</span><br /></code></td> </tr></table><p>That's all for now.</p> <p>Back to <a href="/linux-basic-commands-tutorial">Linux basic commands main page.</a><a></a></p> </div></div></div><!-- google_ad_section_end --><div class="field field-name-field-tags field-type-taxonomy-term-reference field-label-above"><div class="field-label">Tags:&nbsp;</div><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even" rel="dc:subject"><a href="/taxonomy/term/1" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">linux basics</a></div></div></div> Mon, 13 Jul 2009 04:13:02 +0000 jinlusuh 216 at http://www.basicconfig.com http://www.basicconfig.com/linux-basic/linux-redirection-tutorial#comments Basic Slackware Linux learning guidelines for beginner http://www.basicconfig.com/basic_slackware_linux_learning_guidelines_for_beginner <!-- google_ad_section_start --><div class="field field-name-body field-type-text-with-summary field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even" property="content:encoded"><p>Slackware is a great Linux distribution for a beginner to start learning Linux operating system. Slackware enables user to fully control the operating system. Some people say that Slackware is a little hard for a beginner. Some others say that Slackware is primitive. But that's how Slackware works. Ask people who use Slackware, and they will give you several concrete reasons why they choose Slackware and stick with it. </p> <p><a name="partition_guide" id="partition_guide"></a><br /></p><h3>Setup Linux partition</h3> <p>Slackware still using the old fdisk partition tool to create hard disk partition for Linux. Nothing's wrong with that, in fact, it is a great tool and really useful in hard disk maintenance and repair job. Slackware also includes more user friendly partition tool called cfdisk. It is also a great hard disk partition tool.</p> <p>What you need to know about hard disk partitioning for Linux system is to provide a proper size for each partition. For the Slackware partition, it is a good idea to create at least 4 partitions for the Linux system. If we have 160GB hard disk dedicated for Slackware, then the partition would be: </p> <table><thead><tr><th>Mount point</th> <th>Size</th> <th>Filesystem</th> </tr></thead><tbody><tr><td>swap</td> <td>+2048MB</td> <td>sda1</td> </tr><tr><td>/</td> <td>+30000MB</td> <td>sda2</td> </tr><tr><td>/usr/local</td> <td>+20000MB</td> <td>sda3</td> </tr><tr><td>/home</td> <td>+100000MB</td> <td>sda4</td> </tr></tbody></table><p>The swap partition size is double the RAM size. </p> <p>Why giving all the remaining hard disk space to /home directory not / directory? Well, the / directory doesn't need much space. If the Slackware is setup for personal use, then the only partition that need to use / hard disk space would be the /var for the logs. But why give more hard disk space for /home partition, then? When using Slackware Linux for personal computer, you are going to use a normal user account, which the home directory would be in the /home directory by default (only use root when necessary). You would keep all your data (user data) such as multimedia data, mp3, animes, pictures, etc in your home directory. That's why you need a large hard disk space.</p> <h3>Install Slackware</h3> <p>Slackware installation should give no problem if you have the installation manual. The Slackware setup program is a great tool. The instruction on every step explains what you should do. It even recommends or suggests what to do in several occasions.</p> <p>When choosing a graphical user interface desktop system, choose kde. If you have access to the Internet, you can setup networking for Slackware machine during Slackware configuration steps. So when Slackware installation is finished, you already have access to the Internet.</p> <h3>Setup slackpkg</h3> <p>The first thing to do when you finished Slackware installation is to configure <b>slackpkg</b>, Slackware package management system. It's no big deal, everything is already configured. You just need to choose a mirror and start upgrade packages and patch your system.</p> <h3>Create a new user account</h3> <p>It is not recommended to work full time as a root user. You need to create a new user account which you can use to do your work in Slackware. You can use <b>adduser</b> command, which is a simplified tool to create new user account.</p> <h3>Configure video card and monitor</h3> <p>When your system is patched and upgraded, and you already have a normal user account, then it's time to configure Slackware system. The first configuration would be the video card and monitor. New computer comes with advanced video card and bigger wide screen monitor. Slackware already configure that for you but you must check to see if it is the right setting.</p> <p>You can login to the x-window, a graphical user interface and check the setting for your monitor size and resolution. Normally, if you have a wide screen monitor, you'd need to re-configure the setting or re-install the appropriate driver.</p> <h3>Configure mouse</h3> <p>New mouse comes with a scroll function. That didn't work by default in Slackware kde. You need to tweak a bit to make it works. When this is done, you have covered almost all the basics needed in operating system. If you didn't notice, you have learn so many things about Linux configuration at this early stage. That's good for you. Now it's time to learn other serious topics about Linux with the Slackware.</p> <h3>Install VMWare server</h3> <p>VMWare is a virtualization software which enable us to install multiple operating system in Slackware. Download and install vmware server for Linux. It is free. We would use vmware platform to install another Slackware for learning and testing purpose.</p> <h3>Install guess operating system</h3> <p>VMWare enables us to install other operating system in our current Slackware as a guest operating system. We can install other Linux distribution too. But at this stage, if you really want to learn how Linux works, you should install another Slackware to be used as a learning platform. We can configure any Linux server, setup firewall, and everything about Linux. If we messed up, it does not effect our system at all.</p> <p>That's all you need to do to learn Linux operating system using Slackware Linux distribution. You can find almost all basic Linux learning guide mentioned above in basicconfig.com.</p> <p></p> </div></div></div><!-- google_ad_section_end --><div class="field field-name-field-tags field-type-taxonomy-term-reference field-label-above"><div class="field-label">Tags:&nbsp;</div><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even" rel="dc:subject"><a href="/taxonomy/term/1" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">linux basics</a></div></div></div> Fri, 27 Feb 2009 01:54:59 +0000 jinlusuh 133 at http://www.basicconfig.com http://www.basicconfig.com/basic_slackware_linux_learning_guidelines_for_beginner#comments Linux automatic command completion http://www.basicconfig.com/linux/linux_automatic_command_completion_tutorial <!-- google_ad_section_start --><div class="field field-name-body field-type-text-with-summary field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even" property="content:encoded"><p>Linux automatic command completion is a tool or program that can identify what you are typing in the Linux command line terminal and can complete that command, words or sentence for you. This is a really cool feature in Linux.</p> <p>What you need to do to run Linux automatic command completion is pressing the <b>Tab</b> key. It is a program not a magic that can read your mind though. So you need to follow a procedure to use the Linux automatic command completion. Here is the procedure:</p> <ol><li>You must be in the Linux command line terminal or command line interface in x-window.</li> <li>You just key in the first letter of the command you are going to use and then press tab. Linux will automatically complete that command for you. </li> <li>Linux automatic command completion is not going to work if there are other commands, words or sentences that start with the first letter you typed. In this case, you can press <b>Tab</b> key once again (press Tab key two times) to reveal what commands, words or sentences available with that letter. You need to press the second letter or maybe third letter depending on the situation. </li> <li>Linux automatic command completion is not going to work in certain condition such as when you are using <b>man</b> or <b>find</b> commands. </li> <li>Linux automatic command completion is not going to work in text editor. </li> </ol><p>That's some of the conditions regarding Linux automatic command completion. Let's see some examples to make it clear:</p> <p>The first example is we are going to use Linux automatic command completion to complete <b>ls</b> command. So we just type <b>l</b> and press <b>Tab</b> key:</p> <table><tr><td><code>luzar@slackware:~$ l<br /> Display all 122 possibilities? (y or n)<br /></code></td> </tr></table><p>What happened above was, when I press <b>l</b>, Linux automatic command completion didn't work. That means there are many commands start with a letter <b>l</b>. So I press <b>Tab</b> key again to reveal what other commands are. And as you can see there are 122 possibilities available. So I just press <b>n</b> to not to display all 122 possibilities. Why? Because I just want to type <b>ls</b> command and I know what it is. The point here is, if it is a simple command like ls, cd or another 2 or 3 letters commands, we don't need Linux automatic command completion.</p> <p>Now let's see a real useful example. Type <b>cd /v</b> and press <b>Tab</b>. Linux automatic command completion will complete the word to <b>/var/</b>. </p> <table><tr><td><code>luzar@slackware:~$ cd /var/<br /></code></td> </tr></table><p>Next, key in l after the <b>/var/</b> like in the example below and press <b>Tab</b>. Nothing happened. Press <b>Tab</b> again and Linux will show other possibilities started with the letter l.</p> <table><tr><td><code>luzar@slackware:~$ cd /var/l<br /> lib/ lock/ log/<br /></code></td> </tr></table><p>Now, if we want to change directory to <b>lib</b>, then we just need to key in <b>i</b> and press <b>Tab</b> for Linux automatic command completion kick in. However, if we want to change directory to <b>log</b> directory, we need to key in full letters.</p> <table><tr><td><code>luzar@slackware:~$ cd /var/log/<br /> luzar@slackware:/var/log$<br /></code></td> </tr></table><p>That's how Linux automatic command completion works. You don't need to practice using this, instead just use it all the times. This feature use by almost all Linux users. Why? Because it is so helpful. Remember, don't type unless it's necessary, use <b>Tab</b> for Linux automatic command completion. It's fast and it would make you looks like a Linux guru itself.</p> <p>Back to <a href="/linux-basic-commands-tutorial">Linux basic commands main page.</a><a></a></p> </div></div></div><!-- google_ad_section_end --><div class="field field-name-field-tags field-type-taxonomy-term-reference field-label-above"><div class="field-label">Tags:&nbsp;</div><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even" rel="dc:subject"><a href="/taxonomy/term/1" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">linux basics</a></div></div></div> Sat, 31 Jan 2009 16:51:41 +0000 jinlusuh 30 at http://www.basicconfig.com http://www.basicconfig.com/linux/linux_automatic_command_completion_tutorial#comments